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Top 10 Resources for Marketing in 2013: Studious Mix

February 12, 2013

“Voice From the Trenches” is written by Karen Euler, marketing professional and former board member of SMPS Boston. She welcomes questions and topic ideas on Twitter @karen_e.

books_internetThe list of resources for 2012 was a very popular post, so let’s do another one while recovering from the blizzard. I have had a bookish winter, hence the title of this year’s playlist. 

  1. This month’s “Social Media Do’s and Don’ts” post from the Modern Etiquette column on the website Design*Sponge. “When big, old companies join, they only tweet out (promotions) …” Oops, they could well be talking about our industry. Avoid embarrassment if you are charged with refreshing or renewing your firm’s social media strategy or tactics and read the post in its entirety. “Beware the overshare … think before tagging …”
  2. Managing the Professional Service Firm by David H. Maister. This book’s opening passage merits a chuckle from anyone who has sat through mission statement creation meetings: “With varying refinements of language, the mission of most professional service firms is: ‘To deliver outstanding client service; to provide fulfilling careers and professional satisfaction for our people; and to achieve financial success so that we can reward ourselves and grow.'” Industry veterans will recall this classic text from the 90s while newer professionals will find it essential reading to round out their understanding of management issues outside of marketing and business development.
  3. For professional services, LinkedIn has truly come of age. Pro business developers like Steve Flanagan (Lee Kennedy Co.), Aurora Cammarata (Spagnolo Gisness & Associates), and Susan Shelby (Rhino PR) demonstrate every day how to use it effectively to get the word out and engage with the online community. As Anastasia Barnes of High-Profile Monthly says, “It’s very effective for our publication–you cannot deny the impact of LinkedIn on our industry and among our community members.”
  4. Million Dollar Consulting by Alan Weiss. What a cheesy title! This book is something of a classic in its field and is filled with suggestions for business developers. Since marketers do a lot of sales support, we can get lots of tips from this book. The chapter on proposal writing could help many principals write shorter and more effective price proposals.
  5. The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration by Isabel Wilkerson. “One of the great untold stories of American history: the decades-long migration of black citizens who fled the South for northern and western cities, in search of a better life.” Many takeaways for students of urbanism.
  6. Graphic designers. How do we love thee? Let me count the ways. 1. Mark Guarino at Guarino Design Group (see GEI’s logo and collateral and DiMella Shaffer’s website). 2. Meggan Talley at Green Olive Media in Atlanta (see Bergmeyer’s new site). 3. Tim Downing of Design & Co. (see Reed Hilderbrand’s site).
  7. Bellocq Tea. It’s not just tea, it’s a total elevation of the category. First, the product is exquisite, comprised of directly sourced teas and extras like flower petals that bring the whole experience into the realm of perfume. And, the vision statement is equally well-crafted. “Bellocq is refining the luxury tea business to suit the evolving and sophisticated taste of the modern client.” Ah, positioning.
  8. Entertaining at home. The life-work balance may be unattainable, but fun at home can often be nudged up the priority list a notch or two. From the author of The Happiness Project: “Give a warm greeting or farewell every time someone comes or goes from your home.”
  9. Thinking Like Your Editor by Alfred Fortunato and Susan Rabiner. Just as marketers must think like clients, so writers must think like editors, who in turn must think like book buyers. (Whew.) For those who would like to see their work in print someday soon.
  10. ____ Write-in candidate. Suggest another top marketing resource in the comments, please!
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2 Comments leave one →
  1. Pia Cardinali permalink
    February 13, 2013 1:20 pm

    Excellent list of resources. I need to get reading, preferably with a cup of Bellocq tea by my side. My write in for #10 – the SMPS network, as a top marketing resource.

  2. February 13, 2013 1:29 pm

    The creation of the mix tape is a lost art, and I think you played homage to the concept here. Some good points and tips, thank you. I have two items:

    First, I have been recently introduced to Mel Lester’s E-Quip blog. He’s been around a while, but if your life, like mine, revolves around the success and failures of your firm’s proposal efforts then his blog should come in handy. He is verbose, but his points are generally good points. I push these forward in my company and have even heard such responses such as, “Are we doing that? Should we try?” Music to my ears.”Are Your Proposals User Friendly,” was a favorite. A link to his blog posts tagged with the word proposal: http://www.blog-bizedge.biz/search/label/Proposals

    Second, nowadays we create playlists that require a simple drag and drop of the single you bought (off an album you’ll never listen to in its entirety). The mix tape requires listening to hours of music, learning the flow of the album and the songs place in it. Then the painstaking process of song selection that won’t ruin the integrity of the song OR album, but also flows with the new mood you are trying to create. Not to mention the physical act of pressing record and play simultaneously! Just watch High Fidelity with John Cusack. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zu1V3R-Jpwo

    Bonus item: Rye whisky is in. Rye is the short ribs of the whiskey world. It’s trendy and therefore expensive. Everyone knows rye and short ribs should be cheap, but if you haven’t had the opportunity to try Whistle Pig Rye, which is imported from Canada and aged in Vermont, try it. Hopefully a friend has a bottle. Changed my life. (FYI… Old Overholt is my go to. Less than $14 for a liter.)

    MH

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