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12 Graphic Design Days of Christmas

December 16, 2011

Today’s post is courtesy of Mark Guarino of Guarino Design Group Inc. and Jennifer Shelby, CPSM, account director for Rhino Public Relations. Have a question? Just e-mail them at markg@guarinodesign.com or Jennifer@rhinopr.com respectively. (www.guarinodesign.com | www.rhinopr.com)

On the first day of Christmas, my graphic designer gave to me Adobe InDesign in a pear tree. We find InDesign to be the number one tool in our graphic design toolbox.

On the second day of Christmas, my graphic designer gave to me two printer proofs, and Adobe InDesign in a pear tree. Printer proofs can be expensive if author alterations (aa) are the primary cause. Don’t forget to proof your work first!

On the third day of Christmas, my graphic designer gave to me three paper samples, two printer proofs, and Adobe InDesign in a pear tree. Designer Tip: always get a sample of your paper stock before going on press.

On the fourth day of Christmas, my graphic designer gave to me four-color printing, three paper samples, two printer proofs, and Adobe InDesign in a pear tree. Four color printing is made up of cyan, magenta, yellow and black inks (CMYK).

On the fifth day of Christmas, my graphic designer gave to me FIVE CUSTOM TABS, four-color printing, three paper samples, two printer proofs, and Adobe InDesign in a pear tree. Creating custom tabs can be expensive, so if you designer is giving them away for free, smile and say thank you!

On the sixth day of Christmas, my graphic designer gave to me a six column grid, FIVE CUSTOM TABS, four color printing, three paper samples, two printer proofs, and Adobe InDesign in a pear tree. Six columns to lay out text and photos will allow for intricate design. But don’t forget the white space!

On the seventh day of Christmas, my graphic designer gave to me seven pantone swatches, a six column grid, FIVE CUSTOM TABS, four color printing, three paper samples, two printer proofs, and Adobe InDesign in a pear tree. Pantone swatches represent spot color printing in which each color is printed with its own ink. This method is in contrast to process color (CMYK) mentioned above.

On the eighth day of Christmas, my graphic designer gave to me eight style sheets, seven pantone swatches, a six column grid, FIVE CUSTOM TABS, four color printing, three paper samples, two printer proofs, and Adobe InDesign in a pear tree. Style sheets are macros that are set up before documents are laid out to ensure paragraph and text elements are formatted properly. They can be applied with the push of a button. Genius!

On the ninth day of Christmas, my graphic designer gave to me nine special fonts, eight style sheets, seven pantone swatches, a six column grid, FIVE CUSTOM TABS, four color printing, three paper samples, two printer proofs, and Adobe InDesign in a pear tree. Just be sure to use those fonts in different documents. Unless you have a compelling reason to mix things up a bit, try to keep your font choices to no more than two or three per document.

On the tenth day of Christmas, my graphic designer gave to me ten grayscale photos, nine special fonts, eight style sheets, seven pantone swatches, a six column grid, FIVE CUSTOM TABS, four color printing, three paper samples, two printer proofs, and Adobe InDesign in a pear tree. Grayscale imagery is a cost-effective design strategy that can be effective with a deliberate amount of white space and high-contrast photos.

On the eleventh day of Christmas, my graphic designer gave to me eleven software programs, ten grayscale photos, nine special fonts, eight style sheets, seven pantone swatches, a six column grid, FIVE CUSTOM TABS, four color printing, three paper samples, two printer proofs, and Adobe InDesign in a pear tree. Sometimes it takes a village (of software) to raise elegant design, but between photo manipulation, illustration, layout, web design, printing, etc. they can add up. Just make sure they all talk to each-other seamlessly to help keep projects hassle-free.

On the twelfth day of Christmas, my graphic designer gave to me twelve e-newsletters, eleven software programs, ten grayscale photos, nine special fonts, eight style sheets, seven pantone swatches, a six column grid, FIVE CUSTOM TABS, four color printing, three paper samples, two printer proofs, and Adobe InDesign in a pear tree. Don’t underestimate the power of e-marketing to reach your target audience! Monthly e-blasts come often enough to be useful without coming so often that they become annoying.

Thanks for reading our blog this year. We wish all of you a safe, happy and peaceful holiday season.

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